"I’m a big fan of working out on my own. I put my headphones on and I’m pretty good at self-motivating. At the end of the day, I enjoy it. Once I’m there and once I get going, I tend to love it, and I feel good." ― Chris Evans

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Psst, zooeyscigar

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jeremyleerennerdotcom:

"i find myself in troublesome situations quite often. but I don’t get caught."
- jeremy renner

As leavesdancing said, this really is Clint from Critical Feline Mass.

jeremyleerennerdotcom:

"i find myself in troublesome situations quite often. but I don’t get caught."

- jeremy renner

As leavesdancing said, this really is Clint from Critical Feline Mass.

(via leavesdancing)

76 notes

'We Have Always Fought': Challenging the 'Women, Cattle and Slaves' Narrative (by Kameron Hurley)

karabraden:

I often tell people that I’m the biggest self-aware misogynist I know.

I was writing a scene last night between a woman general and the man she helped put on the throne. I started writing in some romantic tension, and realized how lazy that was. There are other kinds of tension.

This is an incredibly powerful, eye-opening article for all writers, but especially the ones who are looking to break their characters out of the tired old tropes.

I’m reminded of my very first phone conversation with my editor, when we were talking about the characters who’d go into my first book. It was her suggestion that Cecily, my heroine, would be the ex-Marine who’d gone the survivalist route, living in the Canadian wilderness. She, not the hero, would’ve been captured in war, tortured, and held prisoner.

My only push-back was that I did not want Cecily to have been raped. I don’t want to downplay the stories of sexual assault survivors, but I wanted people to know there are other challenges women can face. There are other tragedies women can overcome. There are other stories that women have to tell, even in romance.

I think the best thing I could’ve possibly done to develop an awareness of this sort of thing, for my own writing, is all the m/m writing I’ve done. Not only am I less prone to fall into the subconscious trap of “This character is female, therefore I should write her this way," but I’m also very, very aware of those tropes when applied to the "feminine" character — the one who’s smaller, skinnier, prettier, and so on, no matter how that character identifies.

Chalk it up to one more thing I’ve learned from fanfic.

18 notes

did-you-kno:

Toronto’s Garrison Bespoke has created a discreet and comfortable bullet-proof suit for clients who work in dangerous environments. The entire custom-made suit uses nanotechnology to act as a shield, and it’s 50% lighter than Kevlar.
Source

Click the source link, then go watch the video at Garrisonbespoke.com. This is incredible.

did-you-kno:

Toronto’s Garrison Bespoke has created a discreet and comfortable bullet-proof suit for clients who work in dangerous environments. The entire custom-made suit uses nanotechnology to act as a shield, and it’s 50% lighter than Kevlar.

Source

Click the source link, then go watch the video at Garrisonbespoke.com. This is incredible.

(via leavesdancing)

7,967 notes